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Providence, Rhode Island

The Shack

Here are some quick pics of my Amateur Radio Station.

The radio is an Icom 746, all mode HF, with 6 and 2 Meters. The power supply was a borrowed Pyramid 12 amp linear I was using while I worked out a trade for the Astron RS-20M that I have now.

The home built computer has a 1 GHz AMD Athlon processor, 512 MB's of DDR, 128 MB ATI Radeon 9200SE video card, and a very fast Maxtor 20G hard drive.

Besides the usual DVD and CD-RW drives, it also has a second sound card. The extra sound card is used to interface the radio with the computer for digital modes such as PSK31, RTTY, Slow Scan, and APRS and well as others.











Here's a closer shot of the radio. Again, it's the Icom 746. It covers 160 meters through 10 meters continuous (it was "opened up" by the guy I bought it from), along with 6 and 2 meters. It also has general receive from 30 Hertz through 30 MHz, and 108 MHz to 174 MHz. Power output is from 5 to 100 watts on all bands and modes except AM, which is 5 to 40 watts.

There's really not a lot more to say about this rig. The Icom 746 and 746 Pro are very popular radios. Most hams are very familar with them.













Here's a shot of the rig control program running on my computer. It's called Ham Radio Deluxe. It's freeware and is written by Simon Brown, HB9DRV. Besides the ability to control the radio via the computer, this program also has many other features, including PSK31, log book, mapper, DX Cluster program, and many others I haven't had time to play with yet.

The big advantage of using rig control is when you're logging. Since the program knows all the settings of the radio (freq, band, mode, power, time) all you really need to enter is the call sign, signal report, and name. The program will automatically enter your sent rst by reading the signal strength on the S meter.

Below is the Yaesu VX-2 hand held tranceiver. It transmits on 2 Meters and 440 MHz, and has general receive from the AM broadcast band through 999 MHz. The homebrew 3 element 2 meter quad beam was made for me by Art Daniels, K1GTI. That Yaesu really gets out when I hook it up to the beam antenna! The last picture is of a couple of morse code paddles that I have. On the left is a Bencher style iambic paddle. On the right is the Whiterook MK-33 single lever mini-paddle that was designed for portable use.